The Bible and Calvinism (Part 2 of 3)

by Dr. Tom Johnson

In my first article, I discussed the definitions of the Five Points of Calvinism in the acronym “TULIP.”  I shared with you that as I journeyed down the path of this religious philosophy, the Holy Spirit began to convict my heart toward the truth and away from the error of Calvinism.  The following are some examples of what the Lord revealed to me and used to raise questions within me.

First, an all-loving and all-just God told Cain in Genesis 4:7 that “If thou doest well, shalt thou not be accepted?”  I interpreted this to mean that God told Cain that he could overcome sin and be accepted.  We know from Genesis 4:13-16 that Cain did not overcome sin, so God drove him away.  My thought was, “Did God lie to Cain?”  Of course not, and yet, if Calvinism is correct, Cain would have been predestined by God not to be able to overcome sin, so he never could be accepted.  That would, in fact, make God a liar!  Worse, Cain would have had no free will to change his destiny, so that means that God would have created Cain to fail!!  That was not the all-loving and all-just God that I knew from scripture. 

Second, when I studied Deuteronomy 28:1-14, I noted that God said that He would bless Israel if they kept His commandments.  Scripture clearly shows that Israel did not keep God’s commandments.  Was God’s promise to Israel a lie?  Of course not, and yet, if Calvinism is correct, Israel would have been predestined by God not to be able to keep His commandments.  That would, in fact, make God’s promise to Israel a lie!  Worse, Israel would have had no free will to change its future destiny, so that means that God would have created Israel to fail!!  That was not the all-loving and all-just God that I knew from scripture. 

Third, I considered the Great Commission in Matthew 28:19-20 and Mark 16:15-16.  Why would an all-loving and all-just God command Christians to preach the Gospel to every creature if only a select few were predestined to be saved?  I remember thinking, “Was Jesus’ Great Commission a fraud and evangelizing unnecessary?”  Of course not, and yet, if Calvinism is correct, there would be no purpose for Christians to preach the Gospel and evangelize.  Those predestined to heaven would get there whether they hear the Gospel or not, and the non-elect would go to hell because they are unable to choose Christ on their own and be saved whether they hear the Gospel or not.  That would, in fact, make the Great Commission a fraud and evangelism unnecessary!  That was not the all-loving and all-just God that I knew from scripture. 

Fourth, I wondered why an all-loving and all-just God said in II Peter 3:9 that He is “not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance”?  Did God lie?  Of course not, and yet, if Calvinism is correct, some are not able to repent because they would have no free will to repent.  So, that would mean that God would be willing for some to perish.  This would, in fact, make God a liar!  That was not the all-loving and all-just God that I knew from Scripture.

If space permitted, these four examples could easily be forty.  My warning is this: be careful when considering Calvinism – much of it is false teaching.  It can ensnare you.  Definitive works on Calvinism’s negative effects on Biblical Christianity include What Love is This? by Dave Hunt, and The Other Side of Calvinism by Laurence M. Vance.


89873: The Other Side of Calvinism, Revised Edition The Other Side of Calvinism, Revised Edition
By Laurence M. Vance

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